The adventure of the barge-hourglass of Bamako Caen, March 3, 2022, Caen.

The adventure of the barge-hourglass of Bamako Home of French Cities 2 quai de la Londe Caen
2022-03-03 18:30:00 – 2022-03-03 Reception of French Cities 2 quai de la Londe
Caen-Calvados

The Caen Yacht Club is organizing a maritime café on the adventure of the Bamako hourglass barge
Patrick Féron, a researcher specializing in traditional shipbuilding, takes us to the Niger delta, to this 30,000 km2 sea at the height of the flood, between Bamako and Timbuktu. This delta is home to an immemorial pirogue tradition. In 1828, the French explorer René Caillié was the first to describe the Great canoe of Djenné, nine other models enrich the inventory. From 1884, French vessel ensigns recognized the Niger River as far as Timbuktu. These sailors from Niger introduced the architectural tradition of a flat-bottomed barge. Today, the industry of this mixed-race barge has flourished in Bamako, under the effect of the urban expansion of the Malian megalopolis.

The park of more than 53,000 canoes, concentrated in the fishing regions of Timbuktu, Mopti, Ségou demonstrates the vivacity of the ancestral tradition. Among these, the barge-hourglass is the result of one of the oldest boatman know-how and a tradition of innovative nautical architecture. The discovery of this adventure takes us in the footsteps of the Malian carpenters of the Bamako shipyard, builders of the barge-hourglass.
A pot will follow the presentation

The Caen Yacht Club is organizing a maritime café on the adventure of the Bamako hourglass barge

Patrick Ferona researcher specializing in traditional shipbuilding, takes us to the Niger Delta, to this sea of ​​30,000…

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The Caen Yacht Club is organizing a maritime café on the adventure of the Bamako hourglass barge
Patrick Féron, a researcher specializing in traditional shipbuilding, takes us to the Niger delta, to this 30,000 km2 sea at the height of the flood, between Bamako and Timbuktu. This delta is home to an immemorial pirogue tradition. In 1828, the French explorer René Caillié was the first to describe the Great canoe of Djenné, nine other models enrich the inventory. From 1884, French vessel ensigns recognized the Niger River as far as Timbuktu. These sailors from Niger introduced the architectural tradition of a flat-bottomed barge. Today, the industry of this mixed-race barge has flourished in Bamako, under the effect of the urban expansion of the Malian megalopolis.

The park of more than 53,000 canoes, concentrated in the fishing regions of Timbuktu, Mopti, Ségou demonstrates the vivacity of the ancestral tradition. Among these, the barge-hourglass is the result of one of the oldest boatman know-how and a tradition of innovative nautical architecture. The discovery of this adventure takes us in the footsteps of the Malian carpenters of the Bamako shipyard, builders of the barge-hourglass.
A pot will follow the presentation

Home of French Cities 2 quai de la Londe Caen
last update: 2022-02-23 by